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Bowman
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Dickey
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This project utilizes a few different mosquito collection methods including the following trap types that are typically associated with mosquito research.
Slope
Stark
Billings
Golden
Valley
Divide
Burke
Renville
Bottineau
Rolette
Cavalier
Walsh
Pembina
Towner
Pierce
McHenry
Ward
Mountrail
Williams
McKenzie
Mercer
McLean
Sheridan
Wells
Eddy
Ramsey
Grand Forks
Traill
Cass
Richland
Benson
Mosquitoes play an important role within the state of North Dakota.  Mosquitoes can transmit numerous pathogens and viruses to humans, wildlife, and livestock.  It is important to recognize that not all mosquito species can transmit all parasites or viruses.  In addition, mosquitoes are integral to food webs that support amphibian, fish, and avian populations. 

One of the best methods of disease prevention is education which includes, at the foundational level, knowing which mosquito species are found in an ecosystem (and across the state).  Not only is it important to know what species are present, but also when each species is out during the summer and how many mosquitoes are present.  An example of when/and to what extent mosquito numbers play a role is evident when investigating the cases of West Nile virus across our state…typically late July-September when Culex tarsalis populations are at their highest.

Our goal is to recognize mosquito populations across the state of North Dakota by collecting, identifying, and monitoring population trends of mosquitoes throughout the summer months.  In addition, mosquitoes that are engorged (contain blood), can be used to identify what the different mosquito species tend to feed upon (host preference).  As data is collected, the project will also analyze how weather and climate data can influence mosquito populations.

This site will provide information from this project to the public and to other fellow mosquito enthusiasts who may be interested in what mosquitoes are doing in the highly under-researched state of North Dakota.  Support for this project comes from ND INBRE.  Students and faculty present information collected from this project at the annual ND INBRE conference, regional conferences, national meetings, and at other professional organizations such as the Entomological Society of America conferences.

Foster
BG Sentinel-2: Battery operated; CO2 baited trap
Mosquitaire: Battery operated; CO2 baited trap
Common Name - Leafy Spurge Hawk Moth

Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Lepitdoptera
Family: Sphingidae

The Sphingidae are commonly known as sphinx or hawk moths.  Their caterpillars are often known as hornworms based off the presence of what appears to be a dangerous thorny projection at the end of the abdomen. They are given their name based upon the fact that their caterpillars tend to feed on plants in the spurge (Euphorbiaceae) family.  They are most seen in their caterpillar stage, likely due to their bright coloration.
The adults can reach sizes up to three inches (from wing tip to wing tip). Their forewings are often drab in color (olive/brown) but their beauty lies underneath.  The hind wings, which are often covered by forewings, have bright red/pink or orange stripes.
Because of their diet as caterpillars, if consumed can make predatory animals quite sick.  However, for humans (unless you decide to gobble one down) they are considered beneficial insects that help control leafy spurge populations and pollinate both natural and landscape flowers quite readily.





Summary of 2023 Mosquitoes
Videos

Mosquito research update: Mayville, ND and surrounding areas

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